Distant Thunder

Jul 23

characterdesigninspiration:

The latest generator, the random demon maker! Complete with horns, wings, and (mostly) unappealing personality traits, you can make your own demon in varying degrees of non-human-ness.  

(Fun fact you can technically get my headcanon for demon!Dean on Supernatural [but that’s probably like a one in a million chance])

(via iguanamouth)

victoriousvocabulary:

AMISSIO
[noun]
1. loss; something that is lost; no longer possessed or retained.
2. deprivation; dispossession.
Etymology: Latin āmissiō.
[Daniel Conway]
Jul 23

victoriousvocabulary:

AMISSIO

[noun]

1. loss; something that is lost; no longer possessed or retained.

2. deprivation; dispossession.

Etymology: Latin āmissiō.

[Daniel Conway]

Jul 21

elizabethminkel:

vintageanchorbooks:

Literary Word Count Infographic: http://shortlist.com/entertainment/books/literary-word-count-infographic

Sometimes I think about how many fan works I’ve read that are as long as (OR LONGER THAN) these epics. And I think, “Should I really be reading these instead of—” and cut myself off because, like, of course I should.

(via konekodesune)

Jul 21

(Source: amazinggowns, via artisticwitchcraft)

victoriousvocabulary:

PRIMORDIAL
[adjective]
1. constituting a beginning; giving origin to something derived or developed; original; elementary.
2. Embryology: first formed.
3. pertaining to or existing at or from the very beginning.
Etymology: from Late Latin prīmōrdiālis, “of the beginning, original”, from Latin prīmus, “first” + ōrdīrī, “to begin”.
[Freydoon Rassouli - In The Beginning]
Jul 21

victoriousvocabulary:

PRIMORDIAL

[adjective]

1. constituting a beginning; giving origin to something derived or developed; original; elementary.

2. Embryology: first formed.

3. pertaining to or existing at or from the very beginning.

Etymology: from Late Latin prīmōrdiālis, “of the beginning, original”, from Latin prīmus, “first” + ōrdīrī, “to begin”.

[Freydoon Rassouli - In The Beginning]

Jul 20

thesilvereye:

View the fullsize tutorial on DA | The most handy hair structure tutorials are this video by Proko and thisblog post.These are useful for thinking about the direction hair locks flow with different styles: 1 2 3 4 5 | Painting Realistic Hair | Shading with gradients: 1 2 | Tutorials by me including: Gimp Brush Dynamics, Coloring Eyes and Coloring Method.

All example characters are fromThe Silver Eye webcomic!

(via bonesmcoy)

fashioninfographics:

Visual Shoe Dictionary
More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / Hats / Belt knots / Coats / Collars / Darts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem Pants / Heels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / Necklaces / Necklines /  Puffy Sleeves / Shoes / Shorts / Silhouettes / Skirts / Tartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool
Via
Jul 20

fashioninfographics:

Visual Shoe Dictionary

More Visual Glossaries (for Her): Backpacks / Bags / Bra Types / HatsBelt knots / CoatsCollarsDarts / Dress Shapes / Dress Silhouettes / Eyeglass frames / Eyeliner Strokes / Hangers / Harem PantsHeels / Lingerie / Nail shapes / NecklacesNecklinesPuffy SleevesShoes / ShortsSilhouettes / SkirtsTartans / Tops / Underwear / Vintage Hats / Waistlines / Wool

Via

(via sabotensan)

Jul 19

mercenary-tributary:

1962 republic of andolucia manual on demonic constructs

The infographic explanation on how demons work in my story is finally done! @_@ It’s more or less an expanded explanation of this. I worked really hard on it! hope its easy to understand!

EDIT: im gonna put some COOL DEMON FACTZ that i couldn’t fit on the graphic under the cut

Read More

(via plastopia)

Jul 19

likeafieldmouse:

Ward Roberts - Billions (Hong Kong Reflections)

(via regulusblacking)

oldbookillustrations:

Yet Hallblithe speaketh with the king.
Walter Crane, from The Story of the Glittering Plain, by William Morris, Hammersmith, Kelmscott Press, 1894.
(Source: archive.org)
Jul 18

oldbookillustrations:

Yet Hallblithe speaketh with the king.

Walter Crane, from The Story of the Glittering Plain, by William Morris, Hammersmith, Kelmscott Press, 1894.

(Source: archive.org)

(via dduane)