Distant Thunder

Anonymous said: what kind of blogs do you follow

crimewave420:

I follow a wide range of blogs to make sure my own blog content is as inconsistent and annoying as possible

Jul 31
victoriousvocabulary:

SUCCIDUOUS
[adjective]
1. falling, in the process of falling.
2. ready to fall.
3. tottering.
Etymology: Latin succiduus, from succidere, “to fall under”.
[Olivia Chin Mueller - Beware the Bird]
Jul 31

victoriousvocabulary:

SUCCIDUOUS

[adjective]

1. falling, in the process of falling.

2. ready to fall.

3. tottering.

Etymology: Latin succiduus, from succidere, “to fall under”.

[Olivia Chin Mueller - Beware the Bird]

victoriousvocabulary:

ANTHOMANIA
[noun]
an extravagant fondness for flowers; an extreme love for flowers.
Etymology: from Ancient Greek ánthos, “flower” +‎ -mania, “madness”.
[Jérémie Fleury - Little Ida’s Flowers]
Jul 31

victoriousvocabulary:

ANTHOMANIA

[noun]

an extravagant fondness for flowers; an extreme love for flowers.

Etymology: from Ancient Greek ánthos, “flower” +‎ -mania, “madness”.

[Jérémie Fleury - Little Ida’s Flowers]

victoriousvocabulary:

THANATOPSIS
[noun]
1. a meditation upon death; view of or reflection upon death.
2. a meditation on death, as in a poem or essay.
3. the contemplation of death.
Etymology: from Latin thanatos (death) + Greek opsis (a view).
 [Philippe de Champaigne - Vanitas]
Jul 30

victoriousvocabulary:

THANATOPSIS

[noun]

1. a meditation upon death; view of or reflection upon death.

2. a meditation on death, as in a poem or essay.

3. the contemplation of death.

Etymology: from Latin thanatos (death) + Greek opsis (a view).

 [Philippe de Champaigne - Vanitas]

victoriousvocabulary:

FRAMPOLD
[adjective]
1. peevish, touchy, quarrelsome; cross; vexatious; disagreeable; bad-tempered.
2. of a horse: fiery; spirited.
Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from The Two Noble Kinsmen typically attributed to John Fletcher and William Shakespeare.
[Timothy Banks - Precious Pirate]
Jul 30

victoriousvocabulary:

FRAMPOLD

[adjective]

1. peevish, touchy, quarrelsome; cross; vexatious; disagreeable; bad-tempered.

2. of a horse: fiery; spirited.

Etymology: origin uncertain, potentially from The Two Noble Kinsmen typically attributed to John Fletcher and William Shakespeare.

[Timothy Banks - Precious Pirate]

readingontheroof:

INFJ: Visions of the future
ESTP: Superhuman strength
INTJ: Immortality
ESFP: Ability to freeze time
INFP: Literary manipulation
ESTJ: Power negation
INTP: Omniscience
ESFJ: Healing powers
ISFJ: Visions of the past
ENTP: Dimensional travel
ISTJ: Photographic memory
ENFP: Reality warping
ISFP: Shape shifting
ENTJ: Mind control
ISTP: Invulnerability
ENFJ: Empathic powers

(via konekodesune)

Jul 30
Myers Briggs By Superpowers
libutron:

Asperatus Clouds
Known informally as Undulatus asperatus clouds, they can be stunning in appearance, unusual in occurrence, are relatively unstudied, and have even been suggested as a new type of cloud.
Although their cause is presently unknown, such unusual atmospheric structures, as menacing as they might seem, do not appear to be harbingers of meteorological doom.
Reference: [1]
Photo credit: ©Witta Priester | Locality: Hanmer Springs, Canterbury, New Zealand
Jul 27

libutron:

Asperatus Clouds

Known informally as Undulatus asperatus clouds, they can be stunning in appearance, unusual in occurrence, are relatively unstudied, and have even been suggested as a new type of cloud.

Although their cause is presently unknown, such unusual atmospheric structures, as menacing as they might seem, do not appear to be harbingers of meteorological doom.

Reference: [1]

Photo credit: ©Witta Priester | Locality: Hanmer Springs, Canterbury, New Zealand

(via frogbum)

victoriousvocabulary:

NEMORICOLOUS
[adjective]
living in forests or groves.
Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.
[Sylvain Sarrailh]
Jul 27

victoriousvocabulary:

NEMORICOLOUS

[adjective]

living in forests or groves.

Etymology: from Latin nemori- (stem of nemus), “grove” + -colous, a combining form meaning “inhabiting”.

[Sylvain Sarrailh]

"Dialogue Should Move the Story Forward, Provide Information, or Enhance Characterization, Unless You’re Really Witty The best dialogue can do all three. This is a rule that’s often broken by great writers, but before you can get away with breaking it, you have to understand why it exists. Recently, I reread one of my first stories. I thought it would be fun to reread, but I was disappointed in much of the dialogue. In the middle of a scene, my heroine Mildred and the housekeeper broke into an exchange about what my heroine wanted for dinner. I think they were the only two people in the world who cared about it. Readers never even got to see them eat this dinner, and the exchange had no point. It didn’t advance the plot, and it told us nothing about Mildred except that she hated sour beef and dumplings. But let’s say you’re writing a romantic mystery where several people are poisoned by arsenic in the sour beef and dumplings. Suddenly that exchange becomes crucial because the reader knows Mildred was spared because she didn’t like the dish — does this mean the killer poisoned that dish because he didn’t want her to die? Or let’s say the point of the scene is that Mildred’s late father is a famous chef whose specialty was sour beef and dumplings, and Mildred confesses that no longer eats this dish because it brings back too many memories. Now the scene tells us something about Mildred’s personality, not just about her food intake. It wouldn’t take much work to use this exchange to move the plot forward while telling us something about Mildred and sharing the information about the food she likes. Are you a witty author? Are you sure? If so, then you can get away with writing dialogue that doesn’t advance the plot, doesn’t tell us anything about the character, and doesn’t provide information to the reader. But even if you can get away with it, why should you do this? Even the most sparkling dialogue won’t help your story if it’s completely empty of anything but wit."

- Anne Marble, Writing Romantic Dialogue (via cleverhelp)

(via regulusblacking)

Jul 25
victoriousvocabulary:

TUTELARY
[adjective]
1. being or serving as a guardian or protector.
2. of or relating to a guardian or guardianship.
[noun]
3. one that serves as a guardian or protector; a tutelary person, deity, or saint.
Etymology: from Latin tūtēlārius, “guardian”.
[hoooook]
Jul 24

victoriousvocabulary:

TUTELARY

[adjective]

1. being or serving as a guardian or protector.

2. of or relating to a guardian or guardianship.

[noun]

3. one that serves as a guardian or protector; a tutelary person, deity, or saint.

Etymology: from Latin tūtēlārius, “guardian”.

[hoooook]